Sunday, 20 August 2017
News with tag Dark Souls  RSS
The 'Souls-like' label needs to die

Added: 19.08.2017 14:30 | 0 views | 0 comments

Dark Souls is one of the most influential games of the last decade, but it shouldn't be treated as a template.

From: www.pcgamer.com

Games Inbox: No Man’s Sky update verdict, Sonic Mania relief, and Hot Topic part 3

Added: 14.08.2017 17:45 | 1 views | 0 comments

The evening Inbox recommends the Rayman Legends: Definitive Edition demo, as one reader decides Dark Souls II’s reputation is well earned.

From: metro.co.uk

Games reviews roundup: Tekken 7; The Surge; Samurai Warriors: Spirit of Sanada

Added: 13.08.2017 8:38 | 1 views | 0 comments

The veteran fighting series reaches its peak, Dark Souls finds a fitting successor and Japan’s Sengoku era is the setting for some enticing hack and slash
PS4, Xbox One, PC, Bandai Namco, cert 16, out now
★★★★★

From: https:

What are you playing this weekend?

Added: 12.08.2017 16:00 | 4 views | 0 comments

Whether you're LawBreakin', making a DIY trance vibrator for Rez Infinite, or can't quit Dark Souls, we want to hear about it.

From: www.pcgamer.com

GameEnthus Podcast ep319: Ned Stark Flanders or Dark Souls of All

Added: 11.08.2017 8:34 | 2 views | 0 comments

This week Ben(@StrangeBloops) from (@Fabrazz), developer of Slime-San, joins Tiny(@Tiny415), Mike(@AssaultSuit) and Aaron(@Ind1fference) talk about: Slime-San, Fabraz, SAAMArcade, Plant Diver, Board Game Jam, American gods, Game of Thrones, Akira, Ninja Scroll, Voltron, Baby Driver, Drive, Rick and Morty, Szechuan Sauce, Mulan, MAGfest, The Awkward Steve Duology, A Dual Hand Distater: Trackher, Loominary, Speedrunners, Word After Word, Muddledash, Perception, VYE, Dark Souls, Nintendo 64, Hellblade, Fire Emblem Echoes, Bastion, Transistor, Pyre, GNOG, Monument Valley 2, Nier: Automata, Night in the Woods, Tumbleseed, Kingdom Hearts, Pokemon Snap, Hey You Pikachu!, Arms, Chariot, Oceanhorn, Kidd Tripp, Circuit Breakers, Hey Pikmin!, Overcooked Special Edition, Ultimate Chicken Horse, Linelight, Skeleton Boomerang, Fire Pro Wrestling World, Phantom Trigger, Chicken Wiggle, Mutant Mudds, Severed, Graceful Explosion Machine, Nidhogg 2, Superhot VR, Archangel, Theseus and more.

Immortal Planet Review (PC) | Indie Obscura

Added: 10.08.2017 14:37 | 2 views | 0 comments

While the game clearly caters to Dark Souls fans, Immortal Planet reserves little substance for players who hoped for something more.

Tags: PC, Dark Souls
From: n4g.com

Comparing the cityscapes of The Witcher 3, Dark Souls and Bloodborne to medieval paintings

Added: 09.08.2017 8:19 | 3 views | 0 comments


Mention the city in the middle ages, and you likely either conjure images of streets awash in faeces and offal, or of a cosy collection of quaint houses reminding people of gallant knights and ladies. Even though cities harking back to medieval times have been a staple of fantasy games ever since the inception of the genre, they usually do little to challenge the clichés presented by Renaissance fairs or grimdark pseudo-realism. To make things worse, those sterile spaces function primarily as pit stops for the player, a place to get new quests, to rest, or to trade. It's difficult to imagine everyday life in those places once the hero is out of town. They're little more than cardboard cut-outs (I'm looking at you, Skyrim).
A handful of games, however, try to paint a teresting picture. The Witcher 3 boasts a handful of cities that would be exemplary in any medium, but, being found in a video game, have the additional advantage of being able to invite players to intimately explore and study them from every angle. Cities like the central European Novigrad or Oxenfurt, or the Mediterranean Beauclair are vibrant places whose fundaments are firmly grounded in the middles ages despite their more fantastical aspects.
The cityscapes of The Witcher 3 resonate with illustrations from the 15th and 16th century. Good examples are the Nuremberg Chronicle or the Civitates Orbis Terrarum (Cities of the World), a large collection of engravings of cities from all over the known world created by the cleric and geographer Georg Braun and artist Franz Hogenberg. Some of these depictions function as maps, but most simply try to capture the character of a given city, showing it from a low bird's eye view that creates a strong profile and a sense of totality. They're flattering views that emphasise a city's verticality, that is its countless towers of fortifications and cathedrals that emerge in the profile, as well as the way those cities have grown out of or into their natural and agricultural environments. Often, people in colourful attire linger in the foreground, giving both a heightened sense of scale as well as an impression of everyday life in these places.

From: www.eurogamer.net

Comparing the cityscapes of The Witcher 3, Dark Souls and Bloodborne to medieval paintings

Added: 09.08.2017 8:19 | 0 views | 0 comments


Mention the city in the middle ages, and you likely either conjure images of streets awash in faeces and offal, or of a cosy collection of quaint houses reminding people of gallant knights and ladies. Even though cities harking back to medieval times have been a staple of fantasy games ever since the inception of the genre, they usually do little to challenge the clichés presented by Renaissance fairs or grimdark pseudo-realism. To make things worse, those sterile spaces function primarily as pit stops for the player, a place to get new quests, to rest, or to trade. It's difficult to imagine everyday life in those places once the hero is out of town. They're little more than cardboard cut-outs (I'm looking at you, Skyrim).
A handful of games, however, try to paint a teresting picture. The Witcher 3 boasts a handful of cities that would be exemplary in any medium, but, being found in a video game, have the additional advantage of being able to invite players to intimately explore and study them from every angle. Cities like the central European Novigrad or Oxenfurt, or the Mediterranean Beauclair are vibrant places whose fundaments are firmly grounded in the middles ages despite their more fantastical aspects.
The cityscapes of The Witcher 3 resonate with illustrations from the 15th and 16th century. Good examples are the Nuremberg Chronicle or the Civitates Orbis Terrarum (Cities of the World), a large collection of engravings of cities from all over the known world created by the cleric and geographer Georg Braun and artist Franz Hogenberg. Some of these depictions function as maps, but most simply try to capture the character of a given city, showing it from a low bird's eye view that creates a strong profile and a sense of totality. They're flattering views that emphasise a city's verticality, that is its countless towers of fortifications and cathedrals that emerge in the profile, as well as the way those cities have grown out of or into their natural and agricultural environments. Often, people in colourful attire linger in the foreground, giving both a heightened sense of scale as well as an impression of everyday life in these places.

From: www.eurogamer.net

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